Knowledge Translation SPARK NZ

This short trailer documents excerpt findings of a recent pilot case study research about Disabled Refugees telling their stories to participate in the design of services for them.



By compiling an audio-visual repository of oral stories  and distributing the stories to this audience we can palliate the limited knowledge of disability services of disabled refugees and their families. Making these digital stories available to refugee families via multiple sources is essential. Access to this new knowledge will improve outcomes and increase their chances of contributing meaningfully to their new society, by advocating for their rights, working or furthering their education. Some stories are filmed in their native languages because some refugees are illiterate in their own language.

Part of this Knowledge Translation effort will involve the design of a Professional Development programme to update professionals working with disabled refugees about the suggestions made by disabled refugees and their families to improve intervention impact.

Recent research stresses that beyond marginalization, disabled refugees are invisible to disability services and to the rest of society, compounding an already difficult resettlement experience in New Zealand. Stories from families that have navigated disability services are the only source of meaningful help we can provide to them.

Dr. Janson is a SPARK-NZ 2013 fellow researching how the implementation of such storytelling methodologies can accelerate the process of knowledge translation - through which knowledge from the field (refugee voices) reaches policy makers and professionals working in the field.

Dr. Janson will present a keynote address to the NASCA conference 4 September 2013, Wellington on these results, speaking directly to Health and Disability professionals working with refugees. NASCA is the National Association for Needs Assessment and Service Coordination on behalf of the New Zealand Ministry of Health.



[Trailer2 June 2013]